#2 Inequality in the (Post)-Pandemic City: The Class Dimension of Lockdown in South Asia

“What this pandemic has taught people, is to engage with the existing economic inequalities in the city”, says Atreyee Sen in this interview with the Global Research Programme on Inequality for the new series on “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City”.

Interview with Atreyee Sen

“What this pandemic has taught people, is to engage with the existing economic inequalities in the city”, says Atreyee Sen in this interview with the Global Research Programme on Inequality for the new series on “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City”.

Dharavi Chawl. Photo: Adam Cohn/Flickr

 

Building on the accomplishments of the Global Research Programme on Inequality’s (GRIP) Miniseries “COVID-19 and Inequality”, we introduce a new miniseries exploring the long durée implications of the pandemic on urban orders. “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City” probes how different dimensions of inequality are shaped, exacerbated, co-exist or materialized in globally diverse urban contexts. In this series, we provide insights from researchers, scholars and specialists and ask how the effects of the pandemic, including the virus itself or the intervention measures associated with it, are impacting people and communities, particularly in relation to economic, political, social, cultural, environmental and knowledge-based inequalities.

 

Second up in the new series is Atreyee Sen, interviewed by Elina Troscenko, Advisor and Research Coordinator in GRIP.

 

Photo: Atreyee Sen

Atreyee Sen is Associate Professor at the Anthropology Department at the University of Copenhagen. Her main research area is on gender and urban poverty in South Asia.

 

 

 

 

Cover photo by Adam Cohn/Flickr, Dharavi Chawl.