#4 Inequality in the (Post)-Pandemic City: Urban Environments in Eastern Europe

“Urban capitalism has become nastier and more aggressive since the lockdown”, says anthropologist Michał Murawski, UCL, in this interview with GRIP for the miniseries “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City”.

Interview with Michał Murawski

“Urban capitalism has become nastier and more aggressive since the lockdown”, says anthropologist Michał Murawski, UCL, in this interview with GRIP for the miniseries “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City”.

Policing the Park: Moscow, 2018. In 2017, Zaryadye Park became the first new major green space opened in Moscow for half a century. How (in)accessible will our public spaces become in the wake of the pandemic; and how will this impact, in particular, on the shrinking green spaces of post-socialist cities? Photograph by Michał Murawski.

 

The miniseries “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City” probes how different dimensions of inequality are shaped, exacerbated, co-exist or materialized in globally diverse urban contexts. In this series, we provide insights from researchers, scholars and specialists and ask how the effects of the pandemic, including the virus itself or the intervention measures associated with it, are impacting people and communities, particularly in relation to economic, political, social, cultural, environmental and knowledge-based inequalities.

Next up in the series is Michał Murawski, interviewed by Elina Troscenko, Advisor and Research Coordinator in GRIP.

 

 

Michał Murawski is an anthropologist of architecture and of cities based at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London. His work focuses on the complex social lives of monumental buildings, on the architecture and planning of Eastern European communism. He is especially interested in the powerful – and subversive – impacts that communist-era built environments continue to exert on the capitalist cities of the 21st century.