#7 Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City: The Urban Economic Crisis

“It is important to remember that it is not a health or an economic crisis for many people. The economy is a part of their own health crisis, particularly in the cities”, says Astrid Haas from the International Growth Center in Kampala in this interview with GRIP for the miniseries “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City”.

Interview with Astrid Haas

“It is important to remember that it is not a health or an economic crisis for many people. The economy is a part of their own health crisis, particularly in the cities”, says Astrid Haas from the International Growth Center in Kampala in this interview with GRIP for the miniseries “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City”.

Kampala city center
Kampala city center. Photo: Lauren Parnell Marino, Flickr

The Global Research Programme on Inequality’s (GRIP) series “Inequality in the (Post-) Pandemic City” probes how different dimensions of inequality are shaped, exacerbated, materialized or co-exist in globally diverse urban contexts. In this series, we provide insights from researchers, scholars and specialists, asking how the effects of the pandemic, including the virus itself or the intervention measures associated with it, are impacting people and communities, particularly in relation to economic, political, social, cultural, environmental and knowledge-based inequalities.

Next up in the series is Astrid Haas, interviewed by Elina Troscenko, Advisor and Research Coordinator in GRIP.

 

Astrid HaasAstrid Haas is an urban economist who has worked in government and non-governmental organisations across various countries. She is currently the Policy Director of the International Growth Center based in Uganda, where she manages and carries out policy-based research on cities. Her research specialises in urban economics, specifically in the areas of municipal and infrastructure finance, urban mobility and land tenure.