The Imaging Inequality Project

GRIP invited visual artists from across the world to submit their proposals for our “Imaging Inequality” project that aims to explore the various dimensions of inequality by engaging with visual artists to reflect and illustrate different perceptions, representations, and visualizations of inequality in specific contexts.

GRIP invited visual artists from across the world to submit their proposals for our “Imaging Inequality” project that aims to explore the various dimensions of inequality by engaging with visual artists to reflect and illustrate different perceptions, representations, and visualizations of inequality in specific contexts.

Photo:Prerak Shah /Flickr, Photo:Manhhai/Flickr, Photo:Reddalec/Unsplash, Photo:Andrzej /Flickr, Photo:Dany13 /Flickr, Photo:Annie Spratt/Unsplash ‖ Collage:GRIP

 

Inequality, often perceived narrowly as economic differences and reduced to notions of poverty, has multiple dimensions and assumes many faces. It can entail not only differences between levels of wealth, but it can also include variances between the social status of groups; imbalances in access to education, health, justice; differentiated capacity for individuals and groups to influence political decision-making processes; discrimination based on gender, ethnicity, race and religion; unevenness in access to natural resources and benefits from their exploitation; exposure to pollution and risks; as well as differences in access and contribution to types of knowledge. GRIP, being an interdisciplinary and experimental research programme, examines the different understandings of inequality in various contexts and works to illuminate its many forms and shapes.

With our “Imaging Inequality” project we aim to explore the various dimensions of inequality by engaging with visual artists to reflect and illustrate different perceptions, representations, and visualizations of inequality in specific contexts.

Five of the “Imaging Inequality” project applicants have been chosen by a committee to produce visual material. The produced visual material will be featured and published on GRIP webpages as illustrations for our articles, as well as exhibited at the University of Bergen at relevant events, be used in our annual reports, newsletters and social media.

The final five applicants have been announced.